Ballista physics

Catapult Physics Catapult physics is basically the use of stored energy to hurl a projectile the payloadwithout the use of an explosive. The three primary energy storage mechanisms are tension, torsion, and gravity. The catapult has proven to be a very effective weapon during ancient times, capable of inflicting great damage.

Ballista physics

Though ancient Catapults were one of the most effective weapons in siege warfare. Various types of Catapults have been used by the Greeks, Romans, and Chinese.

The first catapults were early attempts to increase the range and power of a crossbow. Diodorus Siculus, a Greek historian, was the first to document the use of a mechanical arrow firing catapult early Ballista in BC.

Catapults as we think of them were introduced to Europe during the Middle Ages. With war prevalent throughout Europe during the Middle Ages the popularity of fortified castle and city wall rose significantly.

This made Catapults an essential. Catapults were also used to throw missiles at soldiers. The first accounted acts of Biological Warfare involved catapults.

Bodies of the diseased were hurled over the city walls to infect the residing citizens. There were 3 main types of Catapults: Ballista The Ballista is basically a giant crossbow.

The word Ballista comes from the Greek word "Ballistes" meaning throw. Believed to have been invented by the Greeks and later modified by the Romans. The Ballista was created to amply to range and power of the crossbow and was the earliest catapult.

Two wood arms looks similar to a bow laid on its side, but with a middle section cut out are attached to a piece of rope. The rope was usually made of human hair or animal sinew. The rope was attached to a winch and pulled back, bending the arm back. When released the Ballista would shoot large arrow, or darts toward the enemy with deadly accuracy.

Despite its accuracy it lacked the power of the Mongonel and the Trebuchet. The Springald The Springald was a smaller version of the Ballista used in tighter confines such as castles or towers.

The photo is courtesy of: The Mangonel was invented by the Romans in BC. The Mangonel consists of a long wood arm with a bucket early models used a sling with a rope attached to the end.

Then the bucket would be loaded. The Mangonel was capable of firing 1, ft. The Mangonel was easy to construct and wheels were added to the design to increase mobility. This photo is courtesy of: Believed to have been created by the Chinese in BC the Trebuchet was the most powerful of the catapults.

The Trebuchet arrived in Europe around AD. The Trebuchet consisted of a long arm could be up to 60 ft long balanced on a fulcrum that was far from center.

The short arm was attached to a counterbalance; a heavy lead weight or a pivoting ballist box filled with earth, sand, or stones. A sling was attached to the end of the long arm.

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A rope was attached to the long arm and pulled down until the counterbalance was high in the air. The energy was stored in the potential energy of the counterbalance. The sling was then loaded with projectiles. The rope was released and the counterbalance plummets down.Physics of a Ballista The Ballista looked like a large frame-mounted crossbow, however, its firing mechanism was quite different.

Ballista physics

Two torsion springs mounted in a frame wound wind in opposite directions to pull back throwing arm. From this equation the velocity of the projectile as it leaves the Ballista system can be determined. Physics off Ballista The Ballista looked like a large frame-mounted crossbow, however, its firing mechanism was quite different.

Two torsion springs mounted in a frame wound wind in opposite directions to pull back throwing arm.

Ballista physics

The design of the ballista is such that the force applied from the projectile comes from the tension of the twisted ropes. The ropes, when the tension is released, tend to return to their rest state with minimum tension, much like a spring would expand after being compressed.

Physics of the Ballista Backround Knowledge The Ballista is a type of catapult. Some people like to thing of the Ballista as a giant crossbow. The Ballista works using tension.

Ballista - Physics of Catapults

Te potential energy is stored in the rope and the arms of "bow." Other Catapults How It Works. Physics of a Ballista The Ballista looked like a large frame-mounted crossbow, however, its firing mechanism was quite different.

Two torsion springs mounted in a frame wound wind in opposite directions to pull back throwing arm.

History of Catapults - Physics of Catapults