Reading writing and arithmetic review

June 15th, 12 replies Release Date: A timeless classic of jangly indie rock. I fell in love with music when I was sixteen years old, and my interest was born out of the electric guitar and all of its shimmering, crunchy possibilities.

Reading writing and arithmetic review

One of the many delights still ahead of us on the schedules? Of course, to really appreciate the impact of the Sundays, it's instructive to look back ever so slightly earlier, to a time that, for a significant sector of the music press readership, was something of an annus horribilis some time before that phrase had really developed much cultural currency, namely This, you'll recall, was when the still-going journeyman phase of Johnny Marr's career really began in earnest, when the notion of things as post-Housemartins referred to their dissolution rather than their figurehead status, and when the indie charts were overrun by - wah!

Yes, we know, but it was a far more purist age. Come to think of it, that'd be quite the sight to behold even now Little wonder it was so adored back then, but what's perhaps surprising is the potency it retains even stripped of all that context.

This, it must be said, is down most of all to one salient point: Conversely, David Gavurin is one of the great overlooked guitarists of the entire canon; he might display shameless debts to more familiar figures at times the aforementioned Marr on 'A Certain Someone', James Honeyman-Scott on 'I Kicked A Boy'but there's a passion and a very real sense of release to his excursions in spangle'n'jangle that make for listening that's much more bewitching that any mere xeroxing could be.

What's also especially striking - and, given the title, wholly appropriate - is just how strong a reflection of student-age life this is, which, on reflection, is a rarer gift than might initially be assumed consider, if you will, how much easier it is to rattle off lists of artists whose oeuvres correlate with adolescent experiences or properly grown-up concerns.

At times, this can be remarkably specific - the excellent 'I Won' is perhaps the only song to ever build itself around flatshare politics - but it also captures the sensation of a life spent in preparation for a rather daunting sense of possibility.

On top of this, there's a fearless smartness in abundance here that it's all too frequently been reasonable to contend has been the great casualty of indie's exodus from the ghetto.

reading writing and arithmetic review

The Sundays were never as prone to flourishes as, say, Wild Beasts, but there's a similar enthusiasm for language, punning on the militaristic aspect of the phrase "Salvation Army", opting for more poetic turns of phrase when lesser artists would have unthinkingly travelled a far more prosaic path "it's that little souvenir of a terrible year that makes my eyes feel sore," for instance, is a lovely touchand coming out with throwaway jewels and joltingly organic observations at regular intervals - it's difficult to think of anyone else, even back then, whose finest hour in 'My Finest Hour' would be simply "finding a pound in the underground", and even listening now lines like "fit the flowers in the bottle of fake cologne" leap out as inspired and uniquely evocative.

Moreover, this sets down a blueprint that would be followed with spectacularly diminishing returns by the Cranberries, which we're sure they'd rather not dwell on. But its real influence is a more benign and lasting one: And, while the NME's review at the time was right to observe that it seemed unlikely you'd ever hear Tina Turner referring to sheds in a song, the alternative would go on to make such a good fist of setting the agenda for the mainstream through the decade that, come '98, the most played song on British radio was a cover of that selfsame shed-mentioning 'Here's Where The Story Ends'.

As a signpost for a bewilderingly terrific time, then, Reading, Writing And Arithmetic remains impeccable, while, as an album in its own right, it's still a seldom-bettered affair.

Cookies on the BBC website

If you enjoy The Quietus, please consider supporting what we do with a one-off or regular donation. If you love our features, news and reviews, please support what we do with a one-off or regular donation. Hit this link to find out more and keep on Black Sky Thinking.The lovely Harriet Wheeler is unmistakably the center of the band, but she's more than a pretty face; almost twenty-five years after the release of Reading, Writing, And Arithmetic, her singing remains nearly unrivaled amongst indie rock bands.

The two best known tracks on Reading, Writing And Arithmetic are the singles Can't Be Sure and Here's Where The Story Ends, and two decades later these remain the best examples of The Sundays. Listen to Reading, Writing & Arithmetic on Spotify.

As a signpost for a bewilderingly terrific time, then, Reading, Writing And Arithmetic remains impeccable, while, as an album in its own right, it's still a seldom-bettered affair.

Share this article: The Lead Review . Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic. Doofy. 1d ago zachthesnack commented on zachthesnack's review of VeggieTales - LarryBoy: The Soundtrack. RuNeN00b commented on Henny's review of Car Seat Headrest - Twin Fantasy.

nv commented on R68saga's review of Twenty One Pilots - .

"Whatever you are not changing, you are choosing." —Laurie Buchanan

Reading, Writing and Arithmetic: A Re-examination Download Issue Against the backdrop of an educational culture resembling “one wild divorce court,” Chesterton’s exhortation to return to “the whole truth of a thing” sums up the cluster of concerns in this issue on schooling: unity with history, unity with the truth of the world, and.

Download Issue. Against the backdrop of an educational culture resembling “one wild divorce court,” Chesterton’s exhortation to return to “the whole truth of a thing” sums up the cluster of concerns in this issue on schooling: unity with history, unity with the truth of the world, and unity with God.

reading writing and arithmetic review
BBC - Music - Review of The Sundays - Reading, Writing and Arithmetic